Events

Spring 2019

2019 Distinguished Lecture Series of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences: Cops, Bodycams and Crisis

Presented by: Dr. Michael D. White

When: Thursday, Feb. 21, 7:00 p.m.
Location: Lindquist Hall, room 101
Cost: Free

There is a long history of crisis-driven reform in American policing. When things go bad for police, change happens. The most recent example of crisis-driven reform involves police body-worn cameras (BWCs). Though there was a slow growing interest in BWCs during the first ten years of this century, adoption of the technology by police exploded after the summer of 2014. That summer, marked by the deaths of Eric Garner in Staten Island and Michael Brown in Ferguson, laid bare the long-term, persistent current of racial tension in American policing. When crisis-driven reform occurs, researchers are often left behind and this is especially problematic for police BWCs, given their enormous potential costs and benefits. Dr. White will describe two ways researchers have tried to inform police policy and practice when it comes to BWCs. The “getting dirty” and “traditional researcher” tracks have helped to provide an evidence base on BWCs for police, and this evidence base has minimized the risks that typically accompany crisis-driven reform.


The Rights of Nature : A Series on Global Indigenous Rights and Nature’s Rights at Weber State, February 19-22

When: Tuesday, Feb. 19, 12:00 p.m.
Location: Wildcat Theater
Cost: Free and open to the public

Film Screening of The Rights of Nature: A Global Movement. Discussion to follow with Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, and Kirsti Luke, Chief Executive of Tuhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngai Tuhoe’sTribal Authority, New Zealand, and Hal Crimmel and Issac Goeckeritz, film producers. 

 

When: Tuesday, Feb. 19, 3:00 p.m.
Location: Shepherd Union, room 320
Cost: Free and open to the public

Pacific Islander Club Meet and Greet with Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, and Kirsti Luke, Chief Executive of Tuhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngai Tuhoe’s Tribal Authority, New Zealand.

 

When: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 11:30 p.m.
Location: Elizabeth Hall, room 229
Cost: Free and open to the public

Rights of Nature Lecture with Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations. 

 

When: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Hurst Learning Center, Dumke Hall
Cost: Free and open to the public

Film Screening of The Rights of Nature: A Global Movement. Discussion to follow with Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, and Kirsti Luke, Chief Executive of Tuhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngai Tuhoe’s TribalAuthority, New Zealand and Hal Crimmel and Issac Goeckeritz, film producers. 

 

When: Thursday, Feb. 21, 12:00 p.m.
Location: Wildcat Theater
Cost: Free and open to the public

Panel on Comparative Treaty Politics: How Are Indigenous Rights Approachedin Different Countries? Moderator: Thom Kuehls, Chair, WSU Department of Political Science. Panelists: Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of WaitangiNegotiations, Kirsti Luke, Chief Executive of Tuhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngai Tuhoe’s Tribal Authority, New Zealand, Michael Platero, J.D., Public Advocacy Manager, Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition, Utah, and Rupert Steele, Tribal Chairman for the Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Indian Reservation, Utah.

 

When: Friday, Feb. 22, 12:00 p.m.
Location: Shepher Union Skyroom
Cost: Free and open to the public


Utah Public Lands and Tribal Rights Policy Solutions Roundtable featuring: Hon Chris Finlayson, Former New Zealand Attorney General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Kirsti Luke, Chief Executive of Tuhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngai Tuhoe’s Tribal Authority, New Zealand,Michael Platero, J.D., Public Advocacy Manager, Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition, Utah, and Rupert Steele, Tribal Chairman for the Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Indian Reservation, Utah.

Lunch included.  


 

The Empire Made Smoke and Flesh: Tobacco, Militarism and Gender in Russia

Presented by: Dr. Tricia Starks

When: Thursday, Feb. 21, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Location: Lindquist Hall, room 205
Cost: Free

This presentation will discuss how advertisers capitalized on the images of smokers as valorous, patriotic, and manly – using images of soldiers and the sexually-available odalisque – to tempt Russians to try a new means for invigorating and pleasuring the political and individual body.

Open to the public.


Weber Historical Lecture Series: How Ogden Became the Junction and Why Salt Lake City Never Forgave Us

Presented by: Val Holley

When: Monday, March 11, 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Hurst Learning Center, Dumke Hall
Cost: Free

Val Holley explores the public celebration in Ogden when the Union Pacific trains chugged into town for the first time on March 8, 1869. He will also discuss Ogden pioneers’ memories of working as railroad graders in 1868–69 for the Central Pacific, under the auspices of Lorin Farr, Chauncey West and Ezra T. Benson.

Open to the public.


Women in Chinese Archaeology and Folklore Studies, 1919-1949

Presented by: Dr. Shana Brown

When: Monday, March 21, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Location: Lindquist Hall, room 205
Cost: Free

This talk will discuss the career of Rong Yuan, a folklore specialist and historian who worked as a secretary at the Harvard-Yenching Institute in Beijing. By excavating a history of a female scholar of high merit but low recognition, this research reshapes the perceptions of how historical research has been conducted in the past, and helps to recognize the contributions made by female scholars.

Open to the public.


Weber Historical Lecture Series: Changing Feelings About Technology: From the Telegraph to Twitter

Presented by: Luke Fernandez and Susan Matt

When: Monday, April 15, 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Hurst Learning Center, Dumke Hall
Cost: Free

Has technology changed how we feel? This talk will examine how Americans' social lives and feelings have changed over the last two hundred years, in response to new technologies — from the telegram to Instagram. The talk is based on Luke Fernandez and Susan Matt's new book, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter.

Open to the public.

Summer 2019

No events are currently scheduled.

Visit this page in the future for upcoming College of Social & Behavioral Sciences events.