Dr. Sara Dant

Chair of History
Brady Presidential Distinguished Professor

Office:  Lindquist Hall 258
Phone: 801-626-6699 
Email: sdant@weber.edu

Profile on Google Scholar

Biography

Sara Dant is Brady Presidential Distinguished Professor and Chair of History whose work focuses on environmental politics in the United States with a particular emphasis on the creation and development of consensus and bipartisanism. Dr. Dant’s latest book is Losing Eden: An Environmental History of the American West (Wiley, 2017), a "thought-provoking, well-written work" about the interaction between people and nature over time.  She is currently working on the Second Edition, which will be published by University of Nebraska Press.  Dr. Dant is also  an advisor and interviewee for Ken Burns' The American Buffalo documentary film, the author of several prize-winning articles on western environmental politics, a precedent-setting Expert Witness Report and Testimony on Stream Navigability upheld by the Utah Supreme Court (2017), co-author of the two-volume Encyclopedia of American National Parks (2004) with Hal Rothman, and she has written chapters for three books on Utah: “Selling and Saving Utah, 1945-Present” in Utah History (forthcoming), “The ‘Lion of the Lord’ and the Land: Brigham Young's Environmental Ethic,” in The Earth Will Appear as the Garden of Eden: Essays in Mormon Environmental History, ed. by Jedidiah Rogers and Matthew C. Godfrey (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2019), 29-46, and “Going with the Flow: Navigating to Stream Access Consensus,” in Desert Water: The Future of Utah’s Water Resources (2014). Dr. Dant was the 2019-2020 John S. Hinckley Fellow at Weber State for excellence in scholarship, teaching, and service and was recognized as a Brady Presidential Distinguished Professor in 2020.  She serves on PhD dissertation committees, regularly presents at scholarly conferences, works on cutting-edge conservation programs, and gives numerous public presentations.  Dr. Dant teaches lower-division courses in American history and upper-division courses on the American West and US environmental history, as well as historical methods and the senior seminar.

Losing Eden: An Environmental History of the American West is a captivating narrative written for a general audience about the interaction between people and nature over time.  Available on Amazon.