WEBER—THE CONTEMPORARY WEST

 

AN INTERNATIONAL, PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL SPOTLIGHTING PERSONAL NARRATIVE, COMMENTARY, FICTION, NONFICTION, AND POETRY THAT SPEAKS TO THE ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST AND BEYOND.

 

       


CURRENT ISSUE

VOL. 37, NO. 2 (SPRING 2021)

 

CONTENTS

Conversation
David Sumner, Madeleine Glenn, and David James Duncan
Susan McKay and Kate Bernheimer
Alice Mulder and Lydia Millet

Poetry
Mikel Vause, Simon Peter Eggertsen, Ellen Malphrus, Thom Schramm, Nancy Takacs, David Axelrod, David Memmott, Michael Rogner, Scott Woodham, Kevin Clark, and Paul Willis

Essay
David Ek, Rachel Lewis, and Stephanie Sarver

Fiction
Kate Bernheimer, William L. Spencer, Merry Christensen, Hannah Chee, Terry Sanville, Pranesh Prasad, and Maria Kochis

Art
Lydia Gravis

 

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I have turned to fiction and memoir immersed in the natural world and the people and places I love, diminished though they are by the industrial assault. I’d rather end my life expressing love than doing battle with inhuman human beings incapable of empathy or even a rudimentary understanding that nature is a tapestry and that the threads they’re rampantly pulling out of the tapestry are unmaking everybody’s world.

—David James Duncan, Vol. 37, No. 2, Spring 2021.

 

HIGHLIGHTS

 

 
  • LYDIA GRAVIS

 
  • DAVID JAMES DUNCAN

 
  • KATE BERNHEIMER

 
  • LYDIA MILLET
 

FEATURED

COMMENTARY:

READING THE WEST

SPRING 2021

Wildlife Archaeology

Archaeologists in New Mexico are analyzing tree rings, pottery, and blasts of light to argue that federal fire suppression policies are partially to blame for the raging wildfires in the West. As Stephen Nash reported: Using dendochronology, or tree-ring dating,
the team examined fire-scarred trees. . .

 

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FICTION:

KATE BERNHEIMER

SPRING 2021

"Whitework"

The cottage into which my companion had broken, rather than allow me, in my desperately wounded condition, to pass a night in the thick-wooded forest, was one of those miniaturized and hand-carved curiosities from the old German folktales that make people roll their eyes
in scorn. . .

 

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EDITORIAL BOARD

Phyllis Barber, author
Katharine Coles, University of Utah
Diana Joseph, Minnesota State University
Nancy Kline, author & translator
Delia Konzett, University of New Hampshire
Kathryn Lindquist, Weber State University
Fred Marchant, Suffolk University
Madonne Miner, Weber State University
Felicia Mitchell, Emory & Henry College
Julie Nichols, Utah Valley University
Tara Powell, University of South Carolina
Bill Ransom, Evergreen State College
Walter L. Reed, Emory University
Scott P. Sanders, University of New Mexico
Kerstin Schmidt, Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt
Daniel R. Schwarz, Cornell University
Andreas Ströhl, Goethe-Institut Washington, D.C.
James Thomas, author
Robert Hodgson Van Wagoner, author
Melora Wolff, Skidmore College

EDITOR

Michael Wutz / mwutz@weber.edu

MANAGING EDITOR

Kristin Jackson / kristinjackson@weber.edu

 


An international, peer-reviewed journal spotlighting

personal narrative, commentary, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry

that speaks to the environment and culture of the American West and beyond.