HAS - Health Promotion

Results of Assessment

2003-2004 (submitted 10/04/04)

Overview

The past academic year was highlighted by a required five-year program review of the health promotion program in general and the health promotion major in particular. The faculty conducted a comprehensive self-study. A four-member program review committee visited campus on October 22, 2003. They reviewed all self-study materials, visited classrooms, met with the faculty, and interviewed several students. A summary of their review follows:

Program Review Summary

Department Response

Revisions of the Health Promotion Major

Program Review Summary for the Health Promotion Program - November 4, 2003

Following the review of the self-study document and other materials prepared by Health Promotion program, the Program Review Team conducted an on-campus review of the facilities, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and adjunct faculty to verify the information contained in the study. Using the self-study standards, the Review Team identified the following:

Program Strengths

  • There were general overall complements for the Program Faculty. There were comments made in regard to their care for students and having personal interest in the success.

  • The students appreciated the field experiences and the real-world values they received while in the program.

  • The new "Advisor" to help facilitate the internship placement and coordination.

  • The value of the online courses.

  • Dedication of the program in creating and enhancing their course offerings. The caring attitude of the faculty in regard to their contributions to the students and having a positive impact on campus' healthy lifestyles.

  • Their service to the community.

  • Increased students enrollment over the years.

  • Contributions to Teacher Education program.

  • Collaboration with Health Professions programs such as HAS.

Program Challenges

  • The program seemed to be understaffed and need to use high number of adjunct faculty to cover the teaching of the needed courses.

  • The reliance on outside agencies to teach substance abuse courses. Since the faculty had off campus office locations, the students did not have easy access to the teacher office hours.

  • Need to make changes or substitutions in some course contents to cover state requirements.

Recommendations for Change

  • Clarify the Professional Health Education tracks by outlining the topics such as:

  • Community emphasis with political science and media literacy

  • Health Promotion emphasis with behavior modification, medical terminology, and HAS

  • Design curriculum patterns with Core Courses, Sub-core Courses and Elective courses to provide clear-cut directions for the students to follow.

  • Since there is online research course is in place, showcase the outcomes from the course for undergraduate research opportunities to provide additional visibility to the program.

  • Have the new appointed coordinator seek and place students for their respective internships.

  • Start the service learning and shadowing programs sooner to expose students to the field earlier in their courses, wherever applicable, i.e. foundation courses and the 3000 or 3150 Community Health courses.

  • Design assessment and evaluation methods for online vs. on-campus outcomes to include both courses and internships.

  • Offer two different sections of Healthy lifestyles/Personal Development as Introduction to Health Promotion with a section for non-majors and a section for majors only. Make sure the sections for "majors only" is content intensive to include the seven core competencies specific for majors.

Health Promotion and Human Performance Department Response

Program Strengths

We appreciate the recognition given to many facets of our program. First, the collaboration with HAS, College of Health Professions, has enabled students to experience first hand the articulation between health promotion and the traditional health sciences. The health promotion major is a blend between programs that gives students greatly expanded knowledge provided by faculty from a variety of different but related disciplines.

Second, the contributions to teacher education. We provide two health courses, one tailored for elementary and the other for secondary teaching majors. We consider this to be a very important part of our mission because directly every elementary teacher is a health educator and every secondary teacher has a significant role in the well-being of students.

Other strengths relate to the evolvement of our program over the last several years. We have some of the most popular elective courses on campus offered on-line, we offer on-line courses in conjunction with other traditional modalities, and we have the potential to offer much more. We have also grown in student enrollment due to a myriad of factors including popular elective courses, more majors and minors, online courses, etc. Because health education and health promotion are becoming a higher priority in the current health care climate we expect growth to continue into the distant future.

Program Challenges

Understaffing

The program seemed to be understaffed and need to use high number of adjunct faculty to cover the teaching of the needed courses.

Response: As stated in the self-study the health promotion program has grown substantially in the last 20 years without any addition to faculty. We anticipate that the most senior faculty member will retire in the next 1 to 3 years. With his retirement we can afford one and a half positions. He will be replaced by an assistant professor. With the remaining salary residue we should be able to fund one-half salary of a second assistant professor. It is imperative that we persuade the administration to fund the other half. One major rationale for an additional faculty position is the need for a person at the Davis campus. Our program offers some of the most popular elective classes on campus for personal growth. In addition to general education SS1030 Health Lifestyles popular courses include stress management, human sexuality, first aid, substance abuse prevention, and consumer health.

Teaching by Adjunct Faculty & Off-Campus Agencies

The reliance on outside agencies to teach substance abuse courses. Since the faculty had off campus office locations, the students did not have easy access to the teacher office hours.

Response: In our view the opportunity to have the Weber County Mental Health, Division of Alcohol and Drugs, which specializes in alcohol and drugs education and teaches DUI classes, teach our Health 3400 Substance Abuse Prevention course is a major asset. They teach the course as part of their mission pro bono. It frees one faculty member from a 3-hour course. In respect to accessibility to faculty this is problematic across all adjunct faculty. They teach all hours of the week and they do not have an office or office hours. Fortunately, the innovation of e-mail and cell phones has greatly eased communication with adjunct faculty. We have asked all adjunct faculty to publish their e-mail, cell phones, and regular phones on their course syllabus. Every student taking a course in our program has technological communication capabilities with their professors. In-person appointments are set at the discretion of the faculty member.

Utah State Office of Education Minimum Requirements for School Health Educators

Need to make changes or substitutions in some course contents to cover state requirements.

Response: Because our school health education preparation program is part of a generic health promotion minor we have had difficulty on two fronts. The first is that the generic health educator, using the seven competencies of the Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES), requires a set of courses that accounts for a high proportion of coursework. The second difficulty is that by virtue of being a minor program greatly delimits the number of credit hours. This was further exacerbated when we changed from a quarter system to a semester system. In totality all of these factors made it difficult if not impossible to meet the content course requirements (mental health/stress management, human sexuality, substance abuse prevention, consumer health, etc.). Because of these factors in the past five years we have make several revisions. First, we have substituted several of the CHES courses for content courses. Second, we have denoted the substitutions in the Weber State University catalogue. Third, we have obtained a separate graduation code for school health minors (giving it the status of a separate minor). Nevertheless, revising the program to reflect all of the requirements of the State Office of Education and separating the school health program from our generic one should resolve the challenge. This will require major curriculum revision and approval that will be done in the next 12 months.

Recommendations for Change

Health Promotion Major Tracks

  • Clarify the Professional Health Education tracks by outlining the topics such as:

  • Community emphasis with political science and media literacy

  • Health Promotion emphasis with behavior modification, medical terminology, and HAS

  • Design curriculum patterns with Core Courses, Sub-core Courses and Elective courses to provide clear-cut directions for the students to follow.

Response: From the inception of the health promotion major we have conformed to the philosophy of the generic health educator. During the 1980's and 1990's the profession conducted many field studies to determine the skills and competencies required of graduate health educators, manifested in the seven competencies of the health educator (CHES) and the basis for the national certification examination. We are still committed to that philosophy. However, there has been ongoing debate regarding the place for health content type courses and support courses. We believe that the evaluation team has made recommendations that have significant merit and that would increase our flexibility of offerings. Using their recommendations we plan on taking the following actions. (Note-One of the concerns of having tracks at the undergraduate level is that no one can predict where a graduate will find a job. This is one of the reasons to emphasize the generic health educator rather than a specialist by setting).

  • The Health Promotion Major will have three or four tracks (school option). The tracks will include community, patients, worksite, and school (contingent upon approval).

  • All majors will take stringent core that emphasizes the seven competencies of a certified health education specialist (CHES).

  • Each track will have a required sub-core pertaining to that setting or practice.

  • Each track will have elective courses.

Health 4013 Assessment and Evaluation for Health Promotion-Undergraduate Research

Since there is online research course is in place, showcase the outcomes from the course for undergraduate research opportunities to provide additional visibility to the program.

Response: With the emerging emphasis on undergraduate research and new opportunities on campus to share results we feel this is most appropriate. Students in the course are required to do research, either experimental or descriptive. The majority of our students do descriptive type surveys. However, because of difficulties in obtaining actual data and the time delays in obtaining approval from the WSU Institutional Review Board (IBD), most students do a hypothetical project. However, students are encouraged to consider an actual research project and they are guided through the approval process. In the past students have presented their research on poster boards and bulletin boards in Swenson Gym. We look forward in encouraging our students to participate in undergraduate research opportunities such as presentations, showcasing on campus, papers at professional conventions, etc.

Internship Placement

Have the new appointed coordinator seek and place students for their respective internships.

Response: It has been our general philosophy that students should contact potential agencies and arrange for an interview. This best emulates the real world experience of job seeking. What we want to do better is to provide them with ideas for potential opportunities, including ones that exist out of state. We are working with our new academic advisor to optimize just such as approach. In the past students have taken videotapes of their experiences, and we have had a library for other students to view. We have used a bulletin board to advertise internships. The Health Education Association of Utah (HEAU) maintains a list of internships for health educators by county. We have notebooks of advertisements for interns from corporations across the country. As an addendum to this recommendation note that we are investigating the development of a web site that would serve as a clearinghouse for internships, based on models from other universities. Because we have no release time for supervision we feel that technology will strengthen our program. Contracts, evaluation forms, notices, etc. would be posted on the web site.

Shadowing Experiences

Start the service learning and shadowing programs sooner to expose students to the field earlier in their courses, wherever applicable, i.e. foundation courses and the 3000 or 3150 Community Health courses.

Response: This is an excellent suggestion. From our experience shadowing experiences are very worthwhile. Our approach has been to introduce students to the various jobs in health promotion by having guest speakers and a panel presentation of health educators visit students in our first course, which is Health 3000 Foundations of Health Promotion. The second major course, which heavily emphasizes the opportunity to learn about the health promotion field, is the Health 3150 Community and Worksite Wellness course. Over the years students in this course have taken field trips to worksite health promotion sites, students have shadowed health educators for several hours, and numerous guest speakers have been invited. In the new program we will make Health 3150 a required course.

Health 4013 Assessment and Evaluation for Health Promotion-Parallelism between Online and On-Campus

Design assessment and evaluation methods for online vs. on-campus outcomes to include both courses and internships.

Response: We try to standardize all of our on-line and on-campus courses, although this is not always possible because of on-line constraints. At the present time students taking Health 4860 Internship (6 CR), whether on-campus or through distance learning, have the exact same requirements. The distance-learning course mirrors the on-campus course 100 %. The main difference is that students in the distant learning program are usually located out of the geographical area prohibiting visitations. The Health 4013 course conducts business exactly the same way. The distance-learning course mirrors the on-line course 100 %. The main difference is that students in the distant learning program are usually located out of the geographical area prohibiting mentored research projects.

Health SS1030 Healthy Lifestyles-Development as Introduction to Health Promotion

Offer two different sections of Healthy lifestyles/Personal Development as Introduction to Health Promotion with a section for non-majors and a section for majors only. Make sure the sections for "majors only" is content intensive to include the seven core competencies specific for majors.

Response: Although this is a very good suggestion it would be very difficult to implement. This course is a general education course not a professional preparation course for majors and minors. It would be ideal if we could have a separate section for majors and minors, where we could be more rigorous plus introduce some basic concepts relating to the field of health promotion, but attracting the 20 or 30 declared majors every year to one section would be virtually impossible. As a general education course Health SS1030 is offered on-campus, in Davis County, at night, on Saturday mornings, through distant learning and on-line. Students who declare their major in health promotion are typically at least first semester juniors, have often attended a junior college or attended WSU with a one or two year break, and have only recently determined their field of interest. However, the faculty recognizes that some students taking the Health SS1030 course may have a professional interest. Therefore we need to use that course as a gateway. Some of the ideas we have discussed are holding a special advising section one evening per semester and inviting students in Health SS1030 to attend for extra credit. We have also discussed including at least a 30-minute session on health promotion jobs and opportunities and associated programs at WSU. We have also discussed developing a more rigorous content overview course for majors. This new course could fulfill the recommendation. We would probably desire to have this as a 2000 level class, and have it meet the general education requirement that Health SS1030 does (as a substitute).

Action Spring Semester 2004-Revision of the Health Promotion Major

In response to several recommendations of the Five-Year Review Team and of our own assessment and self-study, the Health Promotion Major and the HAS: Health Promotion emphasis was changed last spring. The entire major may be viewed in the online catalogue at either Health Promotion Major or Health Services Administration HAS: Health Promotion Emphasis.

Justification: Health Promotion Major Five Year Self-Study, October 2003: The site evaluation team made a strong recommendation to revise the major in order to offer greater flexibility to meet the needs of our majors. We have revised the major to be much more flexible by decreasing the number of required courses. We have also provided flexibility for selecting specialized courses by advisement to meet professional goals by setting of practice (job location)-worksite, community, and clinical. In addition we have increased the number of electives from 12 credit hours to 15 credit hours.

Revised Program-Health Promotion Major Summary

Credit Hours: Old Program 55-56 Credit Hours; Revised Program 55 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: *HthSci LS1110 Biomedical Core Lecture/Lab (4)
or Zool LS1020 Human Biology (3) moved from the Required Support Course area. This was done previously when HAS revised the major two years ago (approved Faculty Senate), but was not updated in the catalog for the Department of Health Promotion and Human Performance.

Courses Required (31) Hours change from (43-44) Hours.
Effectively decreases the number of required courses in order to provide students with more electives. As denoted on the New Program form there are several changes in the Course Required section including:

  • Movement of Health 2700 to Professional Block; HAS 3260 to Professional Block; HthSci LS 1110 & Zool LS1020 to prerequisites

  • Inclusion of Health/Nutrition 3420 as option to HAS 3190

  • Alteration of Health 4860 from 6 hours to 3 hours; Health 3150 and HAS 3150 changed to common name (non-substantive), dual listed, Health/HAS 3150 Community Health.

Professional Block (Minimum of 9 Hours Approved by Advisor-May be Used as Electives)
An added sub-core area where students have the flexibility to select courses most relevant to their professional goals. The courses will be selected predicated upon their expressed professional goals to the advisor. This section includes professional preparation courses related to employment in occupational, community, and clinical settings. Specific changes include:

  • Retention of four (4) existing courses including two (2) from health education and three (3) from health administration.

  • Addition of Health 2400 (3)

  • Development of two (2) health education courses:
    o Health 3100 Applications of Technology to Health Promotion (3)
    o Health 3160 Health Behavior & Special Populations (3)

Elective Courses (15 Hours). Increased from 12 Hours.

The elective area retains the same courses as the old program with the addition of the following courses:

  • AT 3600 Ergonomics for Health and Safety (3)

  • Health 3050 School Health Program (3)

  • Health 4250 Adolescent Health Issues (2)

  • PE 2300 Health/Fitness Evaluation and Exercise Prescription (3)

  • HthSci 1101. Medical Terminology (2) F, S

  • Geront 3000 Death and Dying (3)


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