First Year Experience

Results of Assessment

2005-2006 (submitted 06/15/06)

2005-2006 ASSESSMENT REPORT

FYE standards of excellence were selected in advance of data collection. Most answer choices were formatted in a 5-point Likert scale ranging from least favorable rating (1) to most favorable rating (5), and achievement of FYE’s standard of excellence was defined as a mean rating of at least a 4.0. For the Library’s 6-point scale [since revised to our standard 5-point Likert], achievement of FYE’s standard of excellence was defined as earned ratings of strongly agree or agree from at least 80% of the respondents. As decided before the start of the assessment year, the standard of excellence in the area of attendance at adjunct trainings and mentor trainings was five people from the target audience. For trainings to which fewer than five members of that group were represented, evaluations were analyzed but not reported.

2005-2006 RESPONSES TO 2004-2005 ASSESSMENT FINDINGS

In response to the findings of the 2004-2005 First Year Experience (FYE) Assessment, FYE achieved the following in 2005-2006 to continuously improve its programs and services. More details on most of these achievements and others are reported in subsequent sections of this report:

  • To create a closer connection between FYE cluster faculty and the FYE program, as well as to provide an additional orientation service to FYE students, an Academic Advisement Center advisor visited Fall 2005 cluster classes on behalf of FYE during the first week of the semester. Feedback from advisors and cluster faculty was generally positive, so visitations will be conducted Fall 2006, yet only during the first (rather than the first and second) day of the cluster classes.

  • The FYE Coordinator worked on improving the quality and convenience of instructor trainings and meetings, resulting in significantly better attendance. Unlike last year, all instructor trainings and meetings met the department’s standard of excellence related to attendance.

  • In an effort to formalize and standardize FYE students’ evaluation of mentors, the FYE Coordinator developed a mentor evaluation form subsequent to soliciting input from adjuncts and mentors. Students’ formal evaluations of mentors are now considered in the mentor rehiring process.

  • The FYE Student Specialist administered the Academic Advisement Center’s Academic Self-Assessment Questionnaire to FYE students. The survey was administered to Fall 2005 “Introduction to the University” students to help FYE better gauge and fulfill students’ perceived needs. Summary findings will be shared with the FYE adjuncts and FYE cluster faculty so they have more information on the students they teach.

  • To obtain more specific information on the areas FYE did not well surpass its standards of excellence in student evaluations, a focus group of Spring 2006 FYE students will be conducted during Fall 2006.

  • To ensure that the needs of FYE students are being met in all FYE modules, the FYE Coordinator is working with Career Services and the Library to create an evaluation of the Career Services module and a revised evaluation of the Library module. The Career Services evaluation will be implemented Summer 2006.

2005-2006 EVALUATION OF COURSES AND SERVICES

2005-2006 Evaluation of FYE Promotions

To increase and improve marketing of “Introduction to the University” (EDUC 1105) and FYE student services, a structured marketing plan including dates, activities, and costs was created. The FYE Student Specialist also kept track of how people obtained information about FYE; she logged office visits, monitored hits to the FYE website, and collected information from the FYE cluster registration forms. The information collected from the cluster registration forms indicated that most of the 132 students heard of FYE from the following sources: a new student orientation (41%, 54), the FYE website (17%, 23), an advisor (17%, 22), or FYE’s new student mailing (11%, 14). Some of FYE’s additional outreach and marketing initiatives included manning booths at the Scholarships Fair, Major Fest, and the WSU West Center Open House. Others included an FYE information session, two recruitment sessions for prospective mentors, as well as the production and use of FYE table tents and pocket folders for campus advertising.

2005-2006 ADJUNCT TRAINING

To promote the professional development of FYE adjuncts, FYE sponsored semester Kick-offs and near monthly adjunct meetings. To best plan future trainings, these learning opportunities were evaluated based on quality and content of the presentations.

Semester Kick-offs

The 2005-2006 adjunct training schedule [see Table 1] consisted of two semester Kick-offs. All Kick-offs are evaluated so FYE can use this feedback to plan effective future learning opportunities. Overall, the feedback on adjunct trainings surpassed the department standard of excellence. Attendance was significantly higher than last year’s. To improve attendance at trainings, the Coordinator created the training schedule a semester in advance based on GroupWise calendar searches of adjunct availability. RSVPs were required so sessions with limited interest could be rescheduled or cancelled. Training topic selection will continue to be based on solicited and unsolicited input from FYE’s constituents.

Table 1 : 2005-2006 FYE Semesterly Adjunct Trainings

Date

Training

Presenter [Facilitator: Anna Marie Singleton]

8/18

Fall Kick-Off

Creating a Dynamic Classroom Setting

FYE Website Update

Module Presentations

Library

Academic Advising

Service Learning

Career Services

Fran Butler, Associate Professor, College of Education

Camille Gooch, Academic Advisor, Academic Advisement Center

Fran Zedney, Reference/Instruction Coordinator, Stewart Library

Ashley Owens, Academic Advisor, Academic Advisement Center

Kari Petersen, Coordinator, Community Service Programs

Winn Stanger, Director, Career Services

and Richard Lambert, Career Counselor/Employment Advisor

11/10

Spring Kick-Off

Building Portfolios

Helpful Campus Resources

Module Presentations

Library

Academic Advising

Service Learning

Career Services

Marilyn Diamond & Leanna Riddle, Honors Program

Claire Hughes, Coordinator, Writing Center

Christine Jennings, Tutoring Specialist, Academic Support Services

Fran Zedney, Coordinator, Reference/Instruction Coordinator, Library

Ashley Owens, Academic Advisor, Academic Advisement Center

Kari Petersen, Coordinator, Community Service Programs

Richard Lambert, Career Counselor/Employment Advisor

Adjunct Trainings and Meetings

In addition to the semester Kick-offs, FYE conducted a Summer Training and six adjunct meetings [See Table 2]. Evaluations of the adjunct meetings met or exceeded FYE’s standard of excellence in terms of presentation content and presentation quality for each meeting. Attendance improved from last year. Attendance was improved by building the training schedule a semester in advance based on GroupWise calendar searches of adjunct availability and requesting RSVPs so sessions with limited interest could be rescheduled or cancelled. Training topic selection will continue to be based on participant feedback. The Summer training did not meet the FYE standard of excellence in terms of presentation content; however, it did meet the standard for presentation quality.

Table 2 : 2005-2006 FYE Adjunct Trainings and Meetings

Date

Trainings and Meetings

Guest Presenter

[Facilitator: Anna Marie Singleton]

7/19/05

Summer Training

Drug and Alcohol Module: “Choices”

Judi Kosterman, Vice President, Change Companies

10/20/05

Meeting #1

Major and Career Exploration

Dr. Richard Lambert, Career Counselor, Career Services

Jennifer Wright, Sr. Academic Advisor, Academic Advisement

11/17/05

Meeting #2

Stress Management

Finances

Thinking Mathematically

Critical Thinking

Reading to Remember

Cherlyn Jackson, FYE Adjunct

Russ Paige, FYE Adjunct

Doug Watson, FYE Adjunct

Jennifer Grandi, FYE Adjunct

Leslie Trottier, FYE Adjunct

12/1/05

Meeting #3

Share Fest of Best Practices

Values

Resume Writing

Communication

Diversity

Greg Nielsen, FYE Adjunct

Rebecca Berrett, FYE Adjunct

Anna Marie Singleton, Coordinator, FYE

Lori Drake, FYE Adjunct

01/24/06

Meeting #4

Recognizing Mood Disorders

Dr. Craig Oreshnick, Counseling Psychologist, Counseling Center

Dr. Lisa Jones, Counseling Psychologist, Counseling Center

02/21/06

Meeting #5

Teaching Students How to Write More Effectively

Claire Hughes, Coordinator, Writing Center

04/04/06

Meeting #6

Web Enhancement

Dr. Jill Grob, Director, Academic Advisement Center

Gail Niklason, Director, Online Education & E-Learning

2005-2006 Student Evaluations of “Introduction to the University”

For Fall, student evaluations of Education 1105 instruction indicate that FYE met or exceeded its standard of excellence in 12 of the 14 evaluated areas [see Table 3]. When asked which course topics students thought would most help them be more successful students, the most frequent responses were time management (58), note taking (29), test taking (27), campus resources (26), personality/learning style assessments (21), study skills (16), and academic advising (11). When asked what one change they recommend for future EDUC 1105 classes, the most frequent responses were more group activities (11), less busywork (8), more in-class activities (7), and more challenging material (6). This feedback is always useful for course planning. FYE is pleased with the minimum mean rating increases over last year, acknowledging that in areas where our ratings are high, we can only hope for very minimum improvements.

Table 3: FYE Student Evaluation Comparisons

Statement

2004
Mean*

2005
Mean**

Difference

Instructor…

clearly explained the course goals and requirements in a syllabus

4.4

4.6

+0.2

utilized class time effectively

4.2

4.3

+0.1

used class activities to help fulfill the course objectives outlined in the syllabus

4.3

4.4

+0.1

invited guest speakers who helped me understand the particular topic

4.2

4.5

+0.3

assigned pertinent course work

4.0

4.1

+0.1

supplied helpful feedback on work

4.1

4.1

0.0

was enthusiastic about the course

4.4

4.5

+0.1

demonstrated professionalism

4.3

4.5

+0.2

encouraged participation in class

4.4

4.4

0.0

was accessible outside of class time

4.3

4.2

-0.1

Having taken “Introduction to the University”…

I have an increased ability to use a variety of campus resources such as the library, advisement center, testing center, and tutoring services

4.1

4.1

0.0

I feel this course was worthwhile overall

3.6

3.7

+0.1

I have an increased ability to identify a major and a career of interest

3.8

3.9

+0.1

Increased ability to employ effective academic skills such as note taking, textbook reading, test taking, and time management

3.8

4.1

+0.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* “n”s ranged from 187 to 189

**“n”s ranged from 176 to 178

Advising Module

For First Year Experience’s “Introduction to the University” course, Academic Advisement Center advisors conduct two-day modules for each course section. These are a customized extended version of AAC’s General Education [now called General Studies] Sessions. Data on Fall and Spring were kept separate for two reasons: Significant changes to the Spring presentation were made as a result of the Banner system implementation. Also, there is at least one significant difference between Fall and Spring FYE students: a larger percent of Fall students are first-time freshmen.

In Fall 2005, 240 students were enrolled in FYE. Of them, 62% (149) completed an Advising Module Evaluation. This low response rate was not due to advisor error. It was due to student absenteeism on one or both of the Advising Module days. Students’ evaluations were only considered if they attended both sessions and completed both the pre-module evaluation and post-module evaluation. The FYE Coordinator will work with FYE adjuncts to facilitate increased attendance.

FYE met or surpassed the department standard of excellence in all areas evaluated in the advising module. The highest pre-session/post-session increases were in how to navigate the AAC website (1.84 rating increase), how to declare a major (1.62 increase), how to access web-based information on majors (1.60 increase), and classes allowed to take as a result of College Tier/University Tier (1.55 increase). Compared to last Fall, our post-session to post-session means this Fall improved in all 10 areas and the pre-to-post rating differences improved in 7 of the 10 areas.

Table 4: Fall 2005 Advising Module Evaluations

Knowledge Area

Pre-session
Mean

Post-session
Mean

Pre-Post
Difference

General education requirements

3.15

4.34

+ 1.19

How to navigate AAC website

2.45

4.29

+ 1.84

Classes allowed to take as CT student

2.62

4.18

+ 1.55

Math & English classes I need

3.48

4.46

+ 0.98

How to build a course schedule

3.11

4.27

+ 1.15

How to register for classes

3.83

4.45

+ 0.62

How to officially drop/WD from class

3.19

4.37

+ 1.18

Impact of my GPA on my academic standing

3.53

4.42

+ 0.89

Access web-based information on majors

2.70

4.30

+ 1.60

How to declare a major

2.56

4.19

+ 1.62

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes: Only feedback from those who completed both the pre-session and post-session parts of the tool was included. Also, the “I know how to read and understand a graduation evaluation” question was eliminated in Fall 2005 because we were transitioning between STAARS and Banner graduation evaluations and students had access to neither at that time.

In Spring 2006, 94 students were registered in FYE. Of them, 63% (59) completed an Advising Module evaluation. Compared to Fall 2005, all ten post-session ratings increased. Also, compared to Fall 2005, pre-session/post-session rating differences increased in 7 of the 10 evaluated areas. The highest pre-session/post-session increases were in how to navigate the AAC website (1.91 rating increase), how to declare a major (1.80 rating increase), and how to access web-based information on majors (1.58 rating increase). Compared to last Spring, this Spring’s post-session mean rating data and this Spring’s pre-post differences indicate improvement in 7 of 10 areas.

In Spring, the knowledge area “I know which classes I am allowed to take as result of my College Tier/Univeristy tier standing” was changed to “I understand the importance of completing Math and English.” This change was made because the College Tier policy was eliminated and replaced with the Mandatory Assessment and Placement Policy.

Table 5: Spring 2006 Advising Evaluations

Knowledge Area

Pre-session
Mean

Post-session
Mean

Pre-Post
Difference

General education requirements

3.15

4.56

+ 1.41

How to navigate AAC website

2.46

4.37

+ 1.91

Importance of completing Math and English

3.74

4.75

+ 1.01

Math & English classes I need

3.37

4.64

+ 1.27

How to build a course schedule

3.07

4.34

+ 1.27

How to register for classes

4.00

4.58

+ 0.58

How to officially drop/WD from class

3.33

4.51

+ 1.18

Impact of my GPA on my academic standing

3.62

4.69

+ 1.07

Access web-based information on majors

2.91

4.49

+ 1.58

How to declare a major

2.64

4.44

+ 1.80

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Note: Only students who completed both the pre-session and post-session portions of the instrument were included.

FYE is pleased with the results of the Academic Advising Module evaluations. The pre-session to post-session mean differences reflect that in the Advising Module students are learning a great deal about important advising related information and procedures. The mean ratings continue to rise each semester as improvements are made to the content and presentation of the module.

Library Module

For FYE’s “Introduction to the University” course, the Stewart Library conducts a one-day module. In Fall [See Table 6], the Library Module surpassed the FYE department standard of excellence in all evaluated areas. The most frequent student comment was that the Library Module was very helpful (29). At our request, the Library will revise this instrument to conform with the 5-point scale we utilize in our other evaluations.

Table 6: Fall Library Module Evaluations

Strongly

Agree

Agree

Agree

Somewhat

Somewhat

Disagree

Disagree

Strongly

Disagree

I feel more comfortable asking for help from library staff.

44% (44)

38% (38)

13%

(13)

2%

(2)

2%

(2)

0

I learned more about library services available to help students.

49% (49)

41% (41)

8%

(8)

1%

(1)

0

0

I am better able to use Academic Search Premier to find full text articles

36% (36)

47% (47)

15%

(15)

1%

(1)

0

0

I have a better understanding of the WSU Information Literacy Competency requirement.

39% (39)

38% (38)

16%

(16)

6%

(6)

0

0

Overall, this was an effective session.

45% (45)

41% (41)

7%

(7)

4%

(4)

2%

(2)

0

Overall, this was a useful exercise.

48% (48)

36% (36)

10%

(10)

3%

(3)

1%

(1)

1%

(1)

2005-2006 Mentor Evaluation of FYE

Mentor Retreat

Evaluations of the Mentor’s Fall Retreat were positive, but will not be reported because only three mentors attended (i.e., the department’s minimum attendance standard of five was not met). The FYE Coordinator has since replaced this retreat with an annual mandatory training scheduled well in advance to assure attendance.

“Mentor Leadership Seminar” and “Introduction to the University” Instruction

Fall mentor evaluations of FYE instruction indicated that FYE met or exceeded its standard of excellence in 19 of the 20 evaluated areas. Comparing this Fall to last Fall, the mean rating differences also increased in 19 of the 20 areas.

When asked which topics in “Mentor Leadership Seminar” would help them be most successful as mentors, respondents mentioned presentations (2), mentor-mentor discussions (2), mentor-student communications, and time management. When asked what one change they recommend for future “Mentor Leadership Seminar” classes, responses included increase presentation experiences (2), more out-of-class activities (2), and make mentor attendance mandatory. When asked which of your roles in “Introduction to the University” helped you mentor most effectively, respondents listed getting to know students (4), presentations, communicating with other mentors, and group discussions. When asked what one change they recommend in the responsibilities required of a peer mentor, responses included more responsibility, an out of class social or community service with students, and mandatory attendance for all mentors.

Table 7: Mentor Evaluations of FYE Instructors and Courses

Statement

2004
Mean*

2005
Mean**

Difference

“Mentor Leadership Seminar” Instructor…

clearly explained the course goals and requirements in a syllabus

3.9

4.9

+1.0

utilized class time effectively

3.6

3.9

+0.3

used class activities to help fulfill the course objectives outlined in the syllabus

3.9

4.4

+0.5

invited guest speakers who helped me understand the particular topic

3.8

4.4

+0.6

assigned pertinent coursework

2.9

4.0

+1.1

supplied helpful feedback on my work

4.0

4.6

+0.6

was enthusiastic about the course

4.1

4.8

+0.7

demonstrated professionalism

4.1

4.9

+0.8

encouraged participation in class

4.0

4.8

+0.8

was accessible outside of class time

4.1

4.8

+0.7

Having taken “Mentor Leadership Seminar,”

I feel this course was worthwhile overall

3.4

4.0

+0.6

I have an increased knowledge of WSU departments and services of importance to first year students

4.0

4.6

+0.6

I have an increased ability to communicate through interpersonal interaction, small group discussions, and large group presentations

4.1

4.3

+0.2

I have an increased understanding of my role as a peer mentor

4.0

4.4

+0.4

Participation in the “Introduction to the University” class has:

helped students learn effective academic skills such as note taking, time management, textbook reading, and test taking

3.7

4.6

+0.9

taught student to demonstrate effective communication and interpersonal skills

3.8

4.5

+0.7

instilled in students a sense of belonging to the WSU community

4.3

4.1

-0.2

contributed to the students’ knowledge of WSU departments and services

4.3

4.9

+0.6

assisted students in developing an overall sense of confidence in academic skills

4.1

4.4

+0.3

honed your leadership skills

3.7

4.5

+0.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* “n”s were 6 or 7

**“n”s were 8

2005-2006 ADJUNCT Evaluations of FYE Department

FYE adjuncts’ evaluations of the FYE department indicate that FYE met or exceeded its standard of excellence in all areas. When asked what the most positive aspect of teaching “Introduction to the University” has been, the most frequent responses were connecting with students (5) and seeing students succeed (5). When asked what specific ways FYE can provide better support for future “Introduction to the University” teachers, adjuncts suggested additional training opportunities (2), opportunities to shadow other instructors, improve attendance at adjunct meetings, and improve FYE student attendance.

Table 8: Instructor Evaluations of FYE

Statement

2004
Mean*

2005
Mean**

Difference

As a result of teaching “Introduction to the University” I feel I…

helped students learn effective academic skills such as note taking, time management, textbook reading, and test taking.

4.3

4.4

+0.1

taught students to demonstrate effective communications and interpersonal skills.

4.2

4.5

+0.3

instilled in students a sense of belonging to the WSU community.

4.6

4.7

+0.1

contributed to my students’ knowledge of WSU departments and services.

4.3

4.9

+0.6

assisted students in displaying an overall sense of confidence using academic skills.

***

4.3

***

increased ability to adapt the teaching process to the needs of first year students.

***

4.5

***

increased my knowledge of the academic challenges faced by first year students.

4.0

4.5

+0.5

increased my knowledge of the non-academic challenges faced by first year students.

3.8

4.5

+0.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* “n” was 11

** “n” was 11

*** addition to 2005 evaluation

Coordinator Evaluation of Instructors

The FYE Coordinator evaluated instructors through scheduled class visitations. She rated instructors using an abbreviated version of the student evaluation instrument. Mean evaluation scores (4.7, n=10) exceeded FYE’s standard of excellence, and was consistent with last year’s favorable ratings (4.7, n=12).

2005-2006 Faculty Evaluations of Their Teaching In an FYE Cluster

When asked what the most positive aspect of teaching in an FYE cluster has been, faculty listed the eagerness of students, incorporating new elements into teaching, community, visit from an academic advisor, increased awareness of developmental courses and students who are taking them, and getting to know students. When asked in what specific ways FYE can provide better support for FYE cluster faculty, faculty suggested holding students accountable for attendance and grades in FYE classes, guidance in classroom etiquette, and more opportunities to co-produce curriculum and workshops.

Faculty evaluations of the FYE department indicate that FYE fell below its standard of excellence in all three areas, and fared less well than last year. The results of the faculty evaluations are not considered acceptable to the department. Significant improvements in this area will be a goal of the FYE Coordinator for the upcoming year.

Table 9: Faculty Evaluations of FYE

Statement

2004
Mean*

2005
Mean**

Difference

Teaching a course in FYE has increased your ability to…

adapt the teaching process to the needs of first year students.

3.6

3.2

-0.4

understand the difficulties first year students may have in comprehending course material.

3.7

3.5

-0.2

understand the non-academic challenges facing first year students.

3.3

2.7

-0.6

 

 

 

 


 

* “n” was 7

** “n” was 6

2005-2006 ACADEMIC SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

The areas that FYE students indicated they struggle with the most are setting-up specific times each week to study (2.76), participating in WSU-sponsored events and activities (2.85), reading the chapter before hearing the corresponding lecture (3.06), and studying more than two days in advance for exams (3.20). Most students indicated that they take 12 or more credits each semester, work between 11 and 20 hours per week, and study only 6-10 hours per week.

Despite how low FYE students rated certain important skills etc., these findings indicate that FYE students rated them higher than did the General Students majors on warning, probation or suspension who also completed this instrument. It is interesting that, although most FYE students have been at the university for less time than the warning/probation/suspension students, they tended to self-report that they have fewer problem areas.

These summary data will be shared with all FYE adjuncts and FYE cluster faculty, and be reflected on by FYE staff. Cluster faculty in particular reported a need to better understand first-year students.

Weber State University, Academic Advisement Center

Academic Self-Assessment Questionnaire Findings

All Classes Combined: Fall 2005

 

Yes

No

NA

Are you at least 25 years old, or married, or a parent?

32 (13.8%)

198 (85.3%)

2 (0.9%)

Do either of your parents have a bachelor’s degree or higher?

107 (46.1%)

121 (52.2%)

4 (1.7%)

Do you live in university housing?

47 (20.3%)

183 (78.9%)

2 (0.9%)

Do you live alone?

20 (8.6%)

210 (90.1%)

3 (1.3%)

Does your living environment make studying difficult?

63 (27.2%)

167 (72.0%)

2 (0.9%)

Do your friends and family encourage you to complete your college degree?

228 (98.3%)

2 (0.9%)

2 (0.9%)

Do your work responsibilities interfere with your school responsibilities?

52 (22.4%)

172 (74.1%)

8 (3.4%)

Has at least one employee at Weber State taken a particular interest in your success?

119 (51.3%)

106 (45.7%)

7 (3.0%)

Are you planning on completing a bachelor’s degree?

221 (95.3%)

8 (3.4%)

3 (1.3%)

If so, have you declared a major for a bachelor’s degree?

90 (38.6%)

132 (56.7%)

11 (4.7%)

Have you met with your academic advisor about the course requirements in your program?

92 (39.7%)

134 (57.8%)

6 (2.6%)

Do you know how to prepare for different types of exams (e.g., essay & multiple choice)?

117 (50.4%)

109 (47.0%)

6 (2.6%)

While taking exams, do you feel high levels of anxiety?

133 (57.3%)

92 (39.7%)

7 (3.0%)

Have you used WSU resources such as study skills seminars, tutoring, or study groups?

43 (18.5%)

187 (80.6%)

2 (0.9%)

 

Mean

Median

Mode

I am confident that I made a wise decision to attend college.

4.82

5

5

I find my school work stimulating.

3.69

4

4

I understand the impact of my GPA on my academic standing.

4.35

5

5

I know which classes I am allowed to take as a result of my College Tier or University Tier status.

3.40

3

5

I know how to use the resources at Stewart Library

(books, journals, computers, and web site).

3.09

3

3

 

Median

Mode

How many credits do you take during a typical semester?

12 or more

12 or more

How many hours per week do you work during a typical semester?

11-20

0

How much time per week do you typically spend commuting to campus (roundtrip)?

2 hr or less

1 hr or less

During a typical semester, how many hours do you study each week?

6-10

6-10

 

Mean

Median

Mode

Do you attend class?

4.62

5

5

Do you participate in class?

3.85

4

4

Do you use the course syllabus as a guide to each class?

4.03

4

5

Do you turn in course assignments?

4.38

5

5

Do you keep track of points earned on assignments and exams so you know how you are performing in class?

3.23

3.5

4

In class, is it easy for you to stay focused on learning?

3.53

4

4

When you have questions about course material, do you talk to the instructor?

3.56

4

4

When you miss a class, do you get a copy of the lecture notes from another student or the instructor?

3.59

4

5

Do you read the chapter before you hear the corresponding lecture?

3.06

3

3

While you read the course materials, do you take notes?

3.34

4

4

While reading, do you highlight the main points?

3.35

4

4

To better understand material you are reading, do you reflect on what you have just read?

3.31

3

3

Do you take lecture notes that effectively prepare you for exams?

3.58

4

4

How often do you study more than two days in advance for exams?

3.20

3

3

Do you set-up specific times each week to study?

2.76

3

2

Do you spend enough time studying to be a successful student?

3.44

4

4

When it comes to studying, are you organized?

3.46

4

3, 4

Do you successfully balance your social life and study time?

3.28

3

3

Do you successfully balance school and other responsibilities?

3.51

4

4

Do you use a day planner/calendar to organize your daily responsibilities?

3.46

4

5

Do you participate in WSU-sponsored events and activities (e.g., concerts, plays, and games)?

2.85

3

3

Open Ended Question Responses:

When asked how to make their living environment more conducive to studying, most common responses included eliminating distractions and being alone (134), a useful work space for needed resources (24), listening to music (15), and studying away from home (11). When asked what other questions about their studies we should have asked them in this academic self-assessment, 15% (34) provided suggestions. The most frequent responses were questions about enjoying school (6), study habits (5), and questions about feeling overwhelmed (4).

Total number of evaluations: 232

Of the FYE students, 51% (119) said that at least one employee at Weber State has taken a particular interest in their success, as opposed to only 28% (36) of the warning/probation/suspension students. Also, 40% (92) said they have met with an academic advisor about the course requirements in their program, and only 20% (26) of the SAS students indicated they had met with an advisor.

2005-2006 ASSESSMENT CONCLUSIONS

Findings from this year’s assessment that will be foci for next year’s continued improvements include the following:

Significantly improve students’ attendance at both dates of the Advising Module. [Something else will be addressed: Although not a finding that came from the assessment, FYE will work to significantly improve overall end-of- semester attendance to FYE class.]

To solicit more information on the areas in which FYE is not being evaluated very highly, conduct a focus group of Spring 2006 students during Fall 2006.

Improve low FYE cluster faculty evaluations. To ascertain how the cluster faculty feel they can best serve our FYE students, the FYE Coordinator will schedule one-on-one appointments with the faculty for the very beginning of each semester. The FYE Coordinator will also call cluster faculty during the middle and end of each semester to see if FYE may be of assistance.

In collaboration with the department that conducts the module, implement the evaluation of the one module that is not evaluated right after module completion.