Philosophy Courses

PHIL HU1000. Introduction to Philosophy (3)
An introduction to the methods and problems of philosophy, with special emphasis on topics pertaining to the nature of reality, the theory of knowledge, and value theory.

PHIL HU1120. Contemporary Moral Problems (3)
An introduction to ethical theories and their application to contemporary moral issues, such as human cloning, abortion, and physician-assisted suicide.

PHIL HU1250. Critical Thinking (3)
An introduction to informal logic, focusing on issues of logical form, standards of good and bad reasoning, and argumentative writing.

PHIL QL2200. Deductive Logic (3)
An introduction to the concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic. Emphasis is placed on problems of translating English expressions into logical symbols, on the development of skills in using the formal proof procedures of sentential and predicate logic, and development of the predicate calculus. Prerequisites: MATH ND0990 or placement test eligible for MATH 1010.

PHIL 2920. Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes and Special Programs (1-3)
Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and number of credits authorized will appear on the student’s transcript.

PHIL 3010. History of Philosophy: Classical & Medieval (3)
A survey of the major philosophers and issues from the Presocratics to the beginning of the early modern period, covering such major figures as Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, and Aquinas.

PHIL 3020. History of Philosophy: Modern (3)
A topical survey of the major philosophers and issues from the seventeenth century to the beginning of the nineteenth century (Descartes to Kant).

PHIL 3150. Existentialism (3)
An examination of central themes in Existentialism, including anxiety, dread, freedom, awareness of death, and the consciousness and meaning of existence. These themes will be traced through the writings of such writers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, Sartre, and Simone de Beauvior.

PHIL 3100. Philosophy of Language (3)
A survey of central topics in the philosophy of language, including semantic content, speech acts, and the connection between meaning and truth. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.

PHIL 3200. Philosophy of Democracy (3)
An examination of the ideals of and justifications for democratic institutions.

PHIL 3300. Great Issues in Philosophy (3) Variable Title Course
A selected study of one of the traditional questions of philosophy, such as the nature of knowledge and truth, the mind/body problem, free will/determinism, and the nature of moral/aesthetic value.

PHIL 3350. Medical Ethics (3)
A survey of fundamental moral issues arising from the practice of medicine and from advances in medical science.

PHIL 3400. Great Thinkers of Philosophy (3)Variable Title Course
Selected study of the major works of a single central figure in philosophy. Philosophers whose works may be taught include, but are not limited to: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Mill, and Wittgenstein. May be taken twice with a different philosopher.

PHIL 3500. Philosophy of Western Religion (3)
A survey of topics in the philosophy of religion, especially as they pertain to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

PHIL DV3550. Philosophy of Eastern Religion (3)
An examination of classic philosophical issues in Eastern religious thought, with a special emphasis on Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism.

PHIL 3600. Ethical Theory (3)
An in-depth study of western ethical theories, including utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, virtue ethics, and social contract theory.

PHIL 3650. Aesthetics (3)
An examination of philosophical issues concerning the nature and importance of aesthetic experience and appreciation in the arts and the environment, including questions about the definition of art, artistic representation and expression, and aesthetic value.

PHIL 4250. Philosophy of Law (3)
An examination of central topics in the philosophy of law, including the relationship between law and morality, the justification of punishment, and legal reasoning.

PHIL 4510. Metaphysics (3)
A study of enduring topics concerning the nature of reality, such as the mind/body problem, free will/determinism, the problem of universals, and the existence of God. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.

PHIL 4520. Epistemology (3)
A study of enduring topics in the theory of knowledge, such as the nature of justification; the relationship between knowledge, justification, and belief; the nature of truth; and sources of knowledge. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.

PHIL 4830. Directed Readings (1-2)
Individually designed tutorial for philosophy minors and majors, intended to satisfy program requirements not available through scheduled class offerings.

PHIL 4900. Senior Capstone Seminar (3)
A comprehensive review of the various areas of philosophy and an in-depth study of a single philosopher with the goal of producing a substantial thesis paper.

PHIL 4920. Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes and Special Programs (1-3)
Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and number of credits authorized will appear on the student’s transcript.

  

Weber State University 2011-2012 Catalog