Center for Community Engaged Learning

Water Works

In early spring, 2012, Diane Stern, the Director of Cultural Affairs, Alice Mulder, faculty member in Geography, and Madonne Miner, dean of the College of Arts & Humanities, asked Provost Mike Vaughan if he would consider funding an on-campus visit by Sandra Steingraber, acclaimed ecologist, biologist, and author of Living Downstream, Raising Elijah, as well as essays and poems examining humans’ troubled relationships with water.

Mike Moon suggested we bring in three speakers to address water as a topic rather than just one—and Water Works was born. We now have scheduled five guests from outside WSU (photographer Rosalie Winnard, public artist Andy Dufford, Sandra Steingraber, environmentalist Dan McCool, and explorer Craig Childs) as well as WSU panels, films, art exhibits, and readings, all dealing with water. This cross-college effort is the first in what we hope will be an ongoing series of annual thematic discussions at Weber State.

CCEL Days of Community Engagement

-- Make-A-Difference Day --

Project: Water Preservation
When: October 27, 2012
Where: Parking Lot S4
Time: 9 a.m.
Contact: CCEL, 801-626-7737

Breakfast and t-shirts will be distributed at parking lot S4 to the first 100 volunteers!

If you have a shovel, pick, rake and/or gloves, please bring them. Please also bring your own water bottles.

We will meet in parking lot S4 and then disburse to the individual projects. Volunteer start time at Antelope Island State Park will be 10:00 am. If meeting at Antelope Island State park, meet at the boat dock to the right after the causeway. Look for the Community-based Learning signs.

 

Project 1: Trail maintenance and workout area repair - exercise trail east of Facilities Management building on Ogden campus. We will be grooming the trail, repairing exercise areas and fill those areas with mulch. Repair and replace trail signs.

Project 2: Fall maintenance and Tamarisk removal at Antelope Island State Park. It is important to remove the Tamarisk plant as it is an invasive plant species and consumes large amounts of groundwater.

 

Film Screenings

 

-- Blue Gold, World Water Wars --

Wildcat Theater | October 25, 2012 @ 12:30 p.m. (90 minute movie, plus discussion)

Blue Gold: World Water Wars examines environmental and political implications of the planet's dwindling water supply, and posits that wars in the future will be fought over water. The film also highlights some success stories of water activists around the world and makes a strong case for community action.

-- Watershed: Exploring a New Water Ethic For The New West --

Sponsored by Environmental Issues Committee

Wildcat Theater |  November 19, 2012 7 p.m. | FREE

This film covers the Colorado River watershed, examining its uses, troubles and community efforts to protect and preserve this valuable water resource. http://www.kontentfilms.com/blog/2012/03/22/watershed-narrated-by-robert-redford/

-- Living Downstream --

Sponsored by Environmental Issues Committee

Wildcat Theater | January 15, 2013 | Noon | FREE

Based on the acclaimed book by ecologist and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D., Living Downstream is an eloquent and cinematic documentary film. This poetic film follows Sandra during one pivotal year as she travels across North America, working to break the silence about cancer and its environmental links. After a routine cancer screening, Sandra receives some worrying results and is thrust into a period of medical uncertainty. Thus, we begin two journeys with Sandra: her private struggles with cancer and her public quest to bring attention to the urgent human rights issue of cancer prevention. http://www.livingdownstream.com

-- Flow: for love of water --

 

Sponsored by Environmental Issues Committee

Wildcat Theater | February 12, 2013 | Noon | FREE

Irena Salinas' documentary is about the global crisis we face as Earth's fresh water supply constantly diminishes. The film presents top experts and advocates to show us that every aspect of human life is effected by pollution, wastefulness, privatization and corporate greed as it relates to a natural resource that's more valuable than oil. http://www.flowthefilm.com

Panel Discussions

 

-- The Great Salt Lake: What's it Worth? --

Sponsored by the Environmental Issues Committee

September 26, 2012 | Wildcat Theater | 12:30 pm

 

-- Use and Abuse of Water in Utah --

Sponsored by the Environmental Issues Committee

February 5, 2013 | Wildcat Theater | Noon

Exhibits

-- Photographs by Rosalie Winard --

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

September 1 - 30, 2012 | Bridge Gallery | Shepherd Student Union

-- Fathoms --

November 5, 2012 - December 7, 2012 | Bridge Gallery | Shepherd Student Union

An exploration of the many aspects of water prepared by students in professor Mark Biddle’s graphic design class and Dr. Alice Mulder’s World Environmental Issues class.

-- One Dam Thing After Another: Water, Dams and Utah Construction Co. --

October 1, 2012 - January 1, 2013 | Stewart Library

-- Basin and Range --

January 1 - 31, 2013 | Union Building Gallery

Basin and Range is a “geographic region characterized by parallel mountain ranges separated by flat valley floors which extends from the Wasatch Front in Utah to the Sierra Nevada mountains in California, and from Mexico north to Oregon and central Idaho.” The focus of this exhibit is water in relation to that part of the Basin and Range province that provides the beauty of our own local communities.

Convocations

Sponsored by Office of the Provost and the Department of Student Involvement and Leadership

-- Rosalie Winard --

September 20, 2012 | Noon | Allred Theater | Browning Center for the Performing Arts

The photographer will talk about her ongoing relationship with water birds as well as her photographs of them.

For over a decade, photographer Rosalie Winard has traveled the country by foot, canoe, airboat, and ATV, taking pictures of large birds of the wetlands from Florida to California, Louisiana to North Dakota. Her intimate portraits--tethered to an ethereal palette of white, gray, and black--are alight with Winard's passion for the avian world and its endangered terrain. Alternately meditative and exhilerating, abstract and literal, they capture the birds' remarkable habits and prehistoric forms, as well as their ineffable elegance and humor.

Artist's Website: http://www.rosaliewinard.com

Rosalie Winard Bio

Rosalie WinardPhotographer Rosalie Winard will talk about her ongoing relationship with waterfowl as well as have an exhibit of her photographs on campus.

For over a decade, photographer Rosalie Winard has traveled the country by foot, canoe, airboat, and ATV, taking pictures of large birds of the wetlands from Florida to California, Louisiana to North Dakota. Her intimate portraits--tethered to an ethereal palette of white, gray, and black--are alight with Winard's passion for the avian world and its endangered terrain. Alternately meditative and exhilerating, abstract and literal, they capture the birds' remarkable habits and prehistoric forms, as well as their ineffable elegance and humor.

Rosalie Winard photographs birds as one might a family member caught in an intimate moment, and her avian portraits have been praised as both meditative and exhilarating. She is an award-winning photojournalist and artist recently relocated to Salt Lake City from New York City. Her work on avian life has been published in an award winning book and exhibition WILD BIRDS OF THE AMERICAN WETLANDS, recently shown at the Natural History Museum of Utah. Her photographs have been published in Audubon, ArtForum, OnEarth, Time, The New York Times, Le Monde, Forbes, US News and World Report and have been shown on 60 Minutes, NBC, PBS & BBC. She has been featured on Radio West and other NPR affiliates and has lectured at Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology, the American Museum of Natural History, the Natural History Museum of Utah, the Exploratorium in San Francisco, University of Utah, Weber State University, Mount Holyoke College, the Mono Basin Bird Chatauqua, the Great Salt Lake Bird Festival, the Morro Bay Bird Festival and in SLC public schools. Winard's work is in the collections of the Library of Congress, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Natural History Museum of Utah, The New York Historical Society, Nelson Mandela, Temple Grandin, Oliver Sacks, Errol Morris and others. Her stunning avian photography, seeks to promote awareness and conservation of large wetland birds and their habitats in North America.

-- Andy Dufford: "Envisioning Water" --

October 18, 2012 | Noon | Allred Theater | Browning Center for the Performing Arts

Water inhabits our land and our collective imagination. Artist Andy Dufford, creator of the Ogden River public art "Water Cycle," will discuss how art and imagination can help us understand and care for the watersheds that we each inhabit. A short stone carving demonstration will accompany the talk.

Artist's Website: http://www.chevostudios.com

Sponsored by Office of the Provost and the Department of Student Involvement and Leadership

Andy Dufford Bio

Andy DuffordThe creation of artful spaces is my life's passion.

As a young man, I apprenticed with a painter and completed undergraduate work in design and community development. Traveling through Europe after university was a revelation. Walking through cities built with the skill of artists and artisans expanded my imagination and creating beautiful places became my primary focus. That journey was the beginning of a much longer exploration that continues today.

Over the last 16 years I have developed a value system that guides our work. These core values are community, creativity, timelessness, and craft.

 

 

-- Sandra Steingraber --

January 17, 2013 | Noon | Wildcat Theater | Shepherd Union

Ecologist, author, and cancer survivor, Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D. is an internationally recognized authority on the environment links to cancer and human health.

Artist's Website: http://steingraber.com

Sandra Steingraber Bio

Sandra Steingraber

Steingraber’s highly acclaimed book, Living Downstream: An Ecologist’s Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment presents cancer as a human rights issue. Originally published in 1997, it was the first to bring together data on toxic releases with data from U.S. cancer registries and won praise from international media including The Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, The Lancet, and The London Times. More recently, Steingraber has published Having Faith: An Ecologist’s Journey to Motherhood (2003) and Raising Elijah: Protecting Children in an Age of Environmental Crisis (2011).

 

 

 

-- Dr. Daniel McCool: A New Water Ethic --

February 21, 2013 | Noon | Wildcat Theater | Shepherd Union

Dr. McCool will review current water policy and explain how it has led to unsustainable water consumption, and describe a new water ethic that changes how we relate to both nature and each other in regard to water.

Faculty Profile: http://faculty.utah.edu/u0029400-DANIEL_CRAIG_MCCOOL/biography/index.hml

Daniel McCool Bio

Daniel McCool

Professor of Political Science

Director, Environmental and Sustainability Studies Program

Co-director, University of Utah Sustainability Curriculum Development

Professor McCool’s research focuses on water resource development, public lands policy, voting rights, and Indian water rights. He is the author of:

River Republic: The Fall and Rise of America’s Rivers (2012);Native Waters: Contemporary Indian Water Settlements and the Second Treaty Era (2002) and Command of the Waters: Iron Triangles, Federal Water Development, and Indian Water (1987/1994). He co-authored: Native Vote: American Indians, the Voting Rights Act, and Indian Voting(2007); Staking Out the Terrain: Power and Performance Among Natural Resource Agencies (1996, 2d ed); and Public Policy Theories, Models and Concepts (1995). He edited two books with his students: Waters of Zion: The Politics of Water in Utah (1995) and Contested Landscape: The Politics of Wilderness in Utah and the West (1999). His latest edited book is The Most Fundamental Right: Contrasting Perspectives on the Voting Rights Act (2012).

He has served as a consultant for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U. S. Department of Justice, The ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, and the Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy.

-- Craig Childs: Unbroken Waters: Adventures on a Fluid Planet --

March 14, 2013 | Noon | Room 113 | Browning Center for the Performing Arts

Website: http://www.houseofrain.com

Craig Childs Bio

Craig Childs

Craig Childs is a writer who focuses on natural sciences, archaeology, and remarkable journeys into the wilderness. He has published more than a dozen critically acclaimed books on nature, science, and adventure. He is a commentator for National Public Radio's Morning Edition, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Men's Journal, Outside, Orion, and High Country News. His subjects range from pre-Columbian archaeology to US border issues to the last free-flowing rivers of Tibet and Patagonia.

 

 

 

 

Speakers

-- Dr. Kenneth M. Golden: Mathematics and the Melting Polar Ice Caps --

February 27, 2013 | 7 p.m. | Lind Lecture Hall Room 125/126

Hosted by the College of Science

-- Dr. Kirk Hagen, Department Chair, Engineering WSU: Renewable Energy from Water --

March 21, 2013 | Noon | Special Collections | Stewart Library

Dr. Hagen will speak about renewable energy and will cover basic types of renewable energy that are based on water. There are five topics that will be discussed: hydroelectric, ocean, tides, geothermal and rain.

Sponsored by COAST

-- Dr. Robert Gillies, State Climatologist: Utah's Water Future? The Symphony that is Utah's Climate --

October 10, 2012 | 12:30 p.m. | Room 404 | Shepherd Union

Sponsored by the Environmental Issues Committee


Weber State UniversityOgden, Utah 84408

Privacy PolicyTerms of UseNondiscrimination Policy