Honors Program Courses

Fall 2017

Non-Honors students with a 3.5 GPA are invited to email honors@weber.edu for a departmental override to register for an Honors course.

Note: Click on the Course Title to access a course syllabus. Click on the Course Number to see posters designed to promote these classes. Visit the WSU Course Catalog for a list of Honors classes. Content will be added as it becomes available.

 

Course

Course Title

CRN

Description

Time

Day

Room

Instructor(s)

ENGL 1010

Intermediate College Writing: Nature Writing

21596

What is “wild” and how can we appreciate wildness?  In this course we’ll learn to see the world through the eyes of our nation’s most celebrated nature writers. Stroll through New England woods with Henry Thoreau, befriend a snake in Canyonlands with Edward Abbey, narrowly miss a bear attack on the Appalachian Trail with Bill Bryson, study a pond of lilies with poet Mary Oliver, and climb Yosemite’s heights with naturalist John Muir.  Hike and snowshoe in Ogden’s foothills to experience for yourself what makes us so passionate about place.  

5:30-8:10

R

LI 325

Sunni Wilkinson

HNRS HU1110

Construction of Knowledge

20677

This course examines how knowledge is produced, what it is used for, and what it means. Specifically, it looks to compare different forms of knowledge, their bases and purposes. In our society–even within our own university–we separate and distinguish different ways of making sense of the world. Thus, English departments remain separate from departments of physics; an art studio is across campus from a mathematics building. Although such distinctions might seem obvious, if we think of all different disciplines as representing the learning of some set of ideas and/or skills, the obvious distinction can become more blurred. In this course, you will consider where the edges between different ways of knowing exist, and even where the boundaries of knowledge itself must be. We will look specifically at science, literature, and culture systems to understand how each of these produces unique understandings, how they interact with one another, and how they contrast.

9:00-10:15

TR

LI 325

Christy Call & Sue Harley

HNRS SS1520

History of World War II

20680

World War II is one of the pivotal events of 20th century history.  Why did the war happen?  How was the war fought?  What were the consequences of the war?  What was the American contribution?  Did the Soviet Union really suffer more than any nation and bear the brunt of fighting the Nazis?  Should we have dropped the atomic bombs?  Was the war inevitable or could it have all turned out some other way?  How did the war shape America and the world we live in?  Come find the answers to these questions.

12:00-1:15

TR

LI 325

David Ferro & Eric Swedin

HNRS SS1520

Media-TV History in America

20681

Tracking the development of television programming and other media to both reflect and influence American culture from the post World War II era to the 2010s.

10:30-11:45

TR

LI 325

Tracey Smith

HNRS HU1540

The Apocalypse and After

20682

Western film and literature has been destroying the world in some fashion or other for nearly a century.  In this class, we will explore both historical and contemporary representations of the apocalypse (whether via zombie outbreak, world-wide disease, asteroids crashing into the planet, or political disintegration) in literature, film, and television in order to determine why this particular concept seems to have such currency in the modern world.

10:30-11:20

MWF

LI 325

Scott Rogers

HNRS PS2030

Out of the Woods: Discovering the Role of Forests in Shaping the Earth System

20678

Forests are vitally important ecosystems that range from the tropics to the high latitudes. The regions characterized by expansive tree cover strongly influence the climate system, diversity in animal communities, as well as human culture and economy. In this course, we will explore the dynamics of forest ecosystems in the past, present, and future. While several aspects of the subject matter are inherently complex, the course content will be presented so that the technical details are accessible to all students, regardless of academic background.

9:30-10:20

MWF

LI 325

Jesse Morris

HNRS LS2040

Food and Water for a Hungry World

20679

Unsustainable agricultural practices present the greatest threat to species and ecosystems worldwide. Throughout this course will explore where our food comes from and the future of global food security. We will begin with discussions on a growing global population, conventional industrial agriculture, and genetically modified (GM) crops. You will gain an understanding of the biotechnology used to create GM crops and the environmental, economic and social impacts of GM crops. We will discuss the pros and cons of a global food market versus local food markets, and explore sustainable forms of agriculture. During our exploration of sustainable alternatives to conventional agriculture, you will have the opportunity to conduct original research using state of the art green roof garden experimental units. Lastly, we will consider the impacts of drought and global climate change on the various forms of agriculture.

12:30-3:00

W

LI 325

Bridget Hilbig

HNRS SS2120B

Gender at the Nexus of the Work-Family Debate: Can Women and Men Have it All? 20683

Living in the 21st century can be complicated and fast paced.  Have you ever considered the impact of the 21st century work environment on women and men trying to balance both work AND family?  This course will introduce students to the contemporary work-family debate while exploring its historical context rooted in the cult of domesticity and a culture of two separate spheres - public and private.  Students will explore critical questions related to race, class, gender and policy that shape the work-family debate in American society.  By the end of the course, students will draw their own conclusions about whether women and men can have it all given current expectations of employers, gender norms, family roles, and American culture.

5:30-7:00 M LI 325 Brenda Kowalewski

HNRS HU/DV2130A

The Islamic Renaissance: Islam's Contributions to Science

20684

Students will understand Islamic sciences, technology, and medicine, in their historical and social contexts during the Medieval Ages. Through the Umayyad and, in particular, the succeeding Abbasid Caliphate's early phase, lies the period of Islamic history known as the Islamic Golden Age, between 692 and 945, with stable political structures and flourishing trade. Major religious and cultural works of the empire were translated into Arabic. The culture inherited Greek, Indic, Assyrian and Persian influences, and a new common civilization formed, based on Islam. An era of high culture and innovation ensued.

12:30-1:20

MWF

 

Abdul Nasser Kaadan

HNRS 2920

Maximizing Study Abroad

20366

This interdisciplinary course is designed to be taken in tandem with a WSU Study Abroad experience, either before departure (2920), or after returning (4920).  The aim of this course is to help students better understand and utilize academic approaches to intercultural experiences.  Students will undertake self-analysis from a variety of academic perspectives: 2920 will focus on preparation for the cultural experience; 4920 will focus on unpacking intercultural encounters in order to extend the abroad experience through the academic context to practical, real-world applications.

1:30-2:45

TR

EH 105

Kacy Peckenpaugh & Katie Nelson

HNRS 2920 Making Sense of the News: Reading and Discussing the New York Times 22949 It’s always been important to follow the news, but perhaps more so now than ever, as momentous events play out across the world and in the nation’s capital. This informal, conversation-based class meets once a week to read and discuss the contents of the New York Times, currently available for free to all WSU students, faculty and staff. One credit for students who attend all meetings; no grades, credit/no credit only. Discussions are open to any and all, regardless of whether you’re taking the class for credit or not. Drop in whenever your schedule allows (but attend all class meetings if you want to get credit). 12:00-1:15 R LI 324 Dan Bedford

HNRS 3900

Chemistry of Art

20685

This course is a special investigation of the relationship between chemistry and visual art. Students will learn about different art media from a macroscopic and molecular perspective. This course will also include hands-on visual art projects using media discussed in class including, but not limited to, painting, pencils, charcoal, and clay.

10:30-11:20

MWF

 

Brandon Burnett & Dianna Huxhold

HNRS 4920

Maximizing Study Abroad

20365

This interdisciplinary course is designed to be taken in tandem with a WSU Study Abroad experience, either before departure (2920), or after returning (4920).  The aim of this course is to help students better understand and utilize academic approaches to intercultural experiences.  Students will undertake self-analysis from a variety of academic perspectives: 2920 will focus on preparation for the cultural experience; 4920 will focus on unpacking intercultural encounters in order to extend the abroad experience through the academic context to practical, real-world applications.

1:30-2:45

TR

EH 105

Kacy Peckenpaugh & Katie Nelson

HNRS 4920

Propaganda

20687

A timely introduction to the nature and mechanics of propaganda, from the perspective of present-day philosophy.  Topics to be covered include the history of propaganda; propaganda as language; propaganda as art; "post-truth" and alternative facts; journalistic objectivity; and, epistemic bubbles and echo chambers.

1:30-2:45

TR

LI 325

Mary Beth Willard

HNRS 4990

Honors Senior Project

32705

Instructor approval required for registration

TBA

 

 

Dan Bedford

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