Dr. Kyle Feuz

 
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  • Dr. Kyle Feuz
  • Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Degrees

2014 - PhD in Computer Science from Washington State University
2011 - M.S. in Computer Science from Utah State University
2010 - B.S. in Computer Science from Utah State University

Current field of Study

My research is in the area of artificial intelligence, machine learning and security. I am particularly interested in its application to the areas of Smart Environments, Multi-agents Systems, and Computer Security. With the seemingly inevitable rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) my goal is to ensure that we, as the users of technology, remain in control. I work towards maximizing the usefulness of new technologies while simultaneously preserving and improving privacy and security.

Publications:

Journal Articles

K.D Feuz, D.J Cook, C. Rosasco, and K. Robertson. Automated Detection of Activity Transitions via Decision Trees and Density-Ratio Estimation. IEEE Transactions on Human Machine Systems (THMS) [accepted]

K.D Feuz and D.J Cook. Transfer Learning across Feature-Rich Heterogeneous Feature Spaces via Feature-Space Remapping (FSR). ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology. [accepted]

K.D Feuz and D.J Cook. Heterogeneous Transfer Learning for Activity Recognition using heuristic search techniques. International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications393 - 4182014

D.J Cook, K.D Feuz and N.C Krishnan Transfer learning for activity recognition: A survey. Knowledge and Information Systems 36:537-556 2013

Conferences and Workshops

K.D. Feuz and D. Cook. Real-time annotation tool (RAT). Proceedings of the AAAI Workshop on Activity Context-Aware System Architectures, 2013.

A.S. Crandall, L. Zulas, K.D. Feuz, N.C. Krishnan, and D.J. Cook. Visualizing your ward: Bringing smart home data to caregivers. In Emerging Technologies for Healthcare and Aging Workshop in the Proceedings of Computer Human Interaction, 2012

K.D. Feuz and V. Allan. Group formation and knowledge sharing in pedestrian egress simulation. In 5th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence, SciTePress, February 2013, Barcelona, Spain.

K.D. Feuz and V. Allan. Simulating knowledge and information in pedestrian egress. In 4th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence, pages 246-253. SciTePress, February 2012, Villamoura, Algarve, Portugal.

K.D. Feuz and V. Allan. Simulating pedestrian route selection with imperfect knowledge. In 4th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence, pages 146-153. SciTePress, February 2012, Villamoura, Algarve, Portugal.

Submitted

K.D Feuz and D.J Cook. Collegial Activity Learning between Heterogeneous Sensors. IEEE Pervasive Computing. [submitted]

Other Publications

K.D. Feuz. Pedestrian Leadership and Egress Assistance Simulation Environment. In Intermountain Graduate Research Symposium, Utah State University, 2011

K.D. Feuz, N.V. Sorensen, G. Kerzehner, and C.D. Mano. A comparison of methods to reduce redundancy in internal traffic monitoring to detect botnets. Research Experience for Undergraduates, Computer Science Department, Utah State University 2009

G. Kerzhner, K.D. Feuz, N.V. Sorensen, and C.D. Mano. Taint propagation in a network. Research Experience for Undergraduates, Computer Science Department, Utah State University 2009

Sorensen, N.V. and Sorensen, S.B. and Feuz, K.D. and Kerzhner, G. and Mano, C.D. Detecting covert botnets using communication patterns. Research Experience for Undergraduates, Computer Science Department, Utah State University 2009

Biggest Accomplishment in CS

My first paid programming experience was as a sophomore in college. I created several web-based applications to help cattlemen understand and predict their financial position. My employer later told me that he had been trying to hire someone to write those applications for 10 years and had never found someone who was able to do it.

Something Interesting

I collect old hardware and repurpose it for new things. In a world where everyone wants the latest and greatest, I find that yesterday's technology still has much to offer. When even I can no longer find a use for it, I am loathe to dispose of it. You never know when you might need that old 5 1/4" floppy drive.